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Global Warming Blamed for Extreme Weather Events

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By Meymo Lyons

Following Snowmageddon and other giant storms, Environment Maryland is calling for cuts in emissions blamed for global warming it contends will lead to increases in extreme weather events.

As the backdrop, the environmental group chose Baltimore's Fells Point waterfront neighborhood, which was flooded by Hurricane Isabel in 2003.

The new report, entitled Global Warming and Extreme Weather: The Science, the Forecast, and the Impacts on America, details what Environment Maryland says is the latest science linking global warming to hurricanes, coastal storms, extreme precipitation, wildfires and heat waves.

The report says the United States should commit to cutting global warming pollution over the next decade to 35 percent below 2005 levels.

They say it can be done through a variety of methods, including a cap-and-trade system that allows for the trading of pollution reduction credits, a renewable energy standard to promote the use of clean energy, and strong energy efficiency standards.

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