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Labor Day Woes for Some American Workers

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By Cathy Carter

Labor Day is the yearly national tribute to the American worker, but rising unemployment numbers could be putting a damper on the holiday.

The nation lost 54,000 jobs in August and the economy is still struggling. This Labor Day nearly one in ten Americans are looking for work.

On the National Mall, people are expressing concern. Steve Johnson of Alexandria, Virginia, says the news of the jobless rate is discouraging.

"With people being underemployed, unemployed, I find it hard for a lot of people to really celebrate the meaning and the value of labor when the economy tells them that they are not valued," Johnson says.

In his weekly radio address, President Obama said the country needs to take further steps to create jobs, but Chris Possinger of the District thinks it's a tough road ahead.

"It has gotten to the point where corporations have much more power than normal workers do and you can do what you can when you're a politician, but when the corporate structure is so ingrained into the Unites States, it's pretty hard to change it," he says.

The President has promised to introduce a package of new measures this week to spur job creation. He'll spend Labor Day in Wisconsin speaking on the economy at the annual Laborfest, organized by the Milwaukee Area Labor Council.

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