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Ocean City Open For Business Under Sunny Skies

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By Bryan Russo

Hurricane Earl left Ocean City, Maryland virtually unscathed, and now that it has passed, the town is ready to get back to business as usual.

The sun is out and the beach is already filling up in Ocean City.

Hurricane Earl passed by the beach on Friday and left little more than some big waves for local surfers to conquer.

Danny King, owner of Kingie's Cotton Candy on the Boardwalk, says now the weekend can truly begin.

"All these people that thought the weekend was going to be ruined can all come down here now and it can be a real weekend like it is supposed to be," King says.

The weekend forecast calls for sunny skies and 80 degree days, but Mayor Rick Meehan warns that swimmers should still be cautious of the heavy surf Earl left behind.

"Riptides is a concern. We've had some serious rips ever since Danielle, and we are concerned about that. Its probably our number one concern," Meehan says.

Despite the big waves, the collective sighs of relief in Ocean City are just as strong as any wind gust Earl dished out.

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