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Montgomery County Sued By Concert Promoter

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By Matt Bush

The promoter that owns D.C.'s 930 Club is suing Montgomery County, Maryland over a new concert venue that's being built in Silver Spring. The groundbreaking for the Fillmore Silver Spring was held this week, but it isn't stopping promoter IMP from suing over the venue's construction.

IMP alleges in its lawsuit the administration of county executive Isiah Leggett hid the additional costs of the project from the county council, which approves all county spending. Leggett spokesman Patrick Lacefield says the cost of the project did go up about 3 million dollars, but council members knew that.

"The county council was given an eight-year-old estimate on this. Once we did competitive bidding on the project. The final design, we were able to fix the costs, which were more than the eight-year-old estimate. As soon as we had the final figures, we sent them to the council," Lacefield says.

He says IMP is filing the suit because it does not want the competition the Fillmore will give the similarly-sized 930 Club. The Fillmore will use Live Nation as its promoter.

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