Gallery Place Business Owners Say Teenagers are Hurting their Bottom Line | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Gallery Place Business Owners Say Teenagers are Hurting their Bottom Line

Play associated audio

By Cathy Carter

Business owners in the District's Gallery Place neighborhood say unruly teenagers are costing them customers. Now, they're fighting back with a high tech weapon.

It's called "the mosquito" and it's annoying, but not to everyone. This mosquito, is a device that emits a high pitched sound that only young ears can hear.

It was recently installed outside the Chinatown entrance to the Gallery Place Metro Station to discourage teens from congregating. Sebastian Zutant owns a restaurant in the neighborhood. He thinks the anti-loitering device is a good idea.

"Anything they can do. I mean it's just absurd. You know, I have an outdoor patio, they're constantly harassing all of my patrons, it's just a really icky situation, that anything they can do to get out of it would be fantastic."

Gallery Place was the site of a brawl last month that spilled into the Metro. Three teenagers were arrested. Zutant says these types of incidents are driving patrons away.

NPR

Message From Documentary 'Citizenfour': Be Afraid (Of Surveillance)

Ken Turan reviews the documentary Citizenfour from filmmaker Laura Poitras about Edward Snowden and his decision to leak information about the National Security Agency's surveillance activities.
NPR

A Wisecracking Biochemist Shares Her Kitchen ABCs

Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage's red hue while it's in the pan.
NPR

Georgia Democrat Seeks Republican Votes To Keep His Seat

As the last white Democrat in the deep South, Congressman John Barrow is perennial target. So far, he's managed to stay in office by portraying himself as an independent voice.
NPR

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

If you call 911 from inside a tall building, emergency responders may have difficulty finding you. Cellphone GPS technology currently doesn't work well indoors — but the FCC hopes to change that.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.