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Ocean City Is Already Thinking Past Storm

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

As hurricane Earl marches up the East Coast, battering the coast with rough surf and tropical storm winds, coastal residents say they're ready

A ditch digger is carrying signs and lifeguard chairs off the beach to more sheltered areas.

Anyone with anything that could conceivably get blown away has spent yesterday tying everything down or moving it out of the way.

"Trash cans, lounge chairs, benches, any of our shade structures, canvas enclosures," says Steven Pastuzak, he runs the Jolly Roger amusement park.

And today most people are just shutting themselves in, even tourism director Deb Turk.

"I'm going to be home, going through my kids closets, cleaning them out," says Turk.

But she, like many here say they're already thinking past the storm.

"We'll be monitoring the situation and from what I understand the sun should be out about 4 o'clock and I'm sure we'll want to go out to the beach and see what's going on," she says.

But the fun may not start just yet, there may be a whole lot of clean up to do.

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