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Ocean City Residents Prepare... Or Not

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

Some residents along the Atlantic Coast are beginning to stock up ahead of Hurricane Earl. Few people in Ocean City Maryland are phased by the storm.

At the Wal-Mart off Rt 50, managers have ordered special emergency shipments of generators, batteries and other supplies. Just in time for people like April Dutra who is loading up the trunk of her car..."with water, just in case," she says.

She's been through more than a few hurricanes before, and she's always been prepared.

A couple miles down at the Super Fresh, manager Donald Bell says he expects a rush on snack food but it's never until the last minute.

"It's like a snow storm, people stock up like they gonna be in for a while. I know we'll sell out of water, sodas, chips stuff like that," says Bell.

But William Danek is having absolutely none of it.Hurricane Earl, he says, is no big deal.

"The water may be riled or roiled, but that's great on the beach. It's been mild all summer, so I'm all for a little action on the water," says Danek.

That seems to be the attitude of a lot of people here. And Danek isn't buying water or batteries, just some spinach and pork for dinner.

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