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Montgomery County A Key For Ehrlich

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By Matt Bush

In Maryland, former governor Bob Ehrlich says he thinks he's found an issue in Montgomery County that will help him win back his old job.

For every dollar in state taxes paid by Montgomery County, it receives only about 17 or 18 cents in state funding. Ehrlich says the economic downturn has made this an issue in the state's most populous county.

"In tight fiscal times, when Montgomery County is not as wealthy as it was in prior years and prior decades, it's more of an issue," says Ehrlich.

While the Republican says he sees this as a clear problem, he does not have a clear solution for it. Should he win and go back to Annapolis, a bleak budget picture would await him.

"We've been careful about promises. We've been careful about what we would do, because we do not know what we will inherit in January. But the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior, and Montgomery County made out pretty well during my administration," he says.

But in two runs for governor, Ehrlich has yet to crack 40 percent of the vote in Montgomery County. He received 36 percent of the vote in his last run against O'Malley.


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