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Leaders In Ocean City Prep For Earl

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Forecasters are comparing Hurricane Earl to Hurricane Gloria, which destroyed parts of Ocean City's boardwalk in 1986.
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Forecasters are comparing Hurricane Earl to Hurricane Gloria, which destroyed parts of Ocean City's boardwalk in 1986.

By Bryan Russo

Officials in Ocean City will be meeting today to solidify the final preparations for Hurricane Earl’s arrival on Friday, and although they say they are ready for the worst, the real uncertainty is determining how bad conditions are going to get.

Ocean City is no stranger to hurricanes, even one as large as Earl. Yet, anxiety is starting to rise among locals and town officials as forecasters are comparing the storm to Hurricane Gloria which destroyed almost the entire Boardwalk in 1986.

Emergency Services Director Joe Theobald says that the town is ready for the worst, but he also says if the storm keeps on its current path, the impact of the hurricane on Ocean City will be minimal.

Ocean City’s department heads are meeting with the Mayor and City Council this morning to coordinate their final plans, and they have the backing of FEMA, the US Army Corps of Engineers and Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley.

Theobald says that even though the city has an evacuation plan in place, he doesn’t expect that it will have to be implemented.

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