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Discovery Channel Employees Recount Their Experience In Hostage Sitaution

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By David Schultz

Thedra White was not one of the people in the Discovery building when the gunman, James Lee, entered and started taking hostages. She just happened to be walking down a nearby street when she saw people running away. "No talking or anything but you could see a look of panic on faces," she said.

Another man, who asked us not to use his name because he's not authorized to speak with the media, was in the building when the hostage situation began. "There was no official announcement coming through," he says. "And it was kind of a slow process, this realization of what was happening.

He says after around 15 minutes, everyone in the building received an email telling them to stay in place.

"So I remembered a room that was in the middle of the building that had no windows. So I saw somebody go in there and I went in there, and they were tentative about opening the door. They did open the door, and I went in. And I was in there for a good 20, 25 minutes," he says.

But then he received word everyone was evacuating, so he poured onto the street along with all his coworkers-- all except the three who were taken hostage.

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