D.C. Schools Improve, But Still Have Long Road Ahead | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

D.C. Schools Improve, But Still Have Long Road Ahead

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

D.C.'s traditional public schools have shown dramatic improvements in the past five years, that's according to a new report by the Washington Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs.

But there is still lots left to do before D.C. catches up to neighboring suburban school districts.

A 2005 report by the same organization used words such as "deplorable" and "substandard" to describe DCPS. Five years later, those have mostly changed to "impressive" and "unprecedented."

Ron Flagg who oversaw the study says teacher salaries are now competitive with surrounding jurisdictions, test scores have generally increased and special education services have been revamped. Dozens of school buildings have been renovated and nurses now use computers to manage student health information.

But Flagg is quick to qualify the improvement.

"While we've made wonderful progress in the last several years, it's fragile progress," says Flagg.

The report also finds principals' salaries, funding for athletic programs and courses such as foreign languages and music programs continue to lag behind surrounding school districts.

WAMU 88.5

'Historic Landmark' Status Complicates Corcoran Renovations

Plans by George Washington University to renovate the Corcoran Gallery of Art may be thrown for a loop after D.C.'s historic preservation board designated much of the interior of the building as a historic landmark.

NPR

In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

The Southern Museum of Food and Beverage in New Orleans chronicles the eats and drinks of the Southern states. And it may be one of the only museums where visitors can imbibe while viewing exhibits.
NPR

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

In the New York Congressional district where an an unarmed black man died at the hands of police last year, neither candidate for a special congressional election is using the death to score points.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.