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Virginia Firefighters Receive Gift Of Steel From New York City

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The beams of steel were escorted from New York City by more than 500 motorcycles and support vehicles.
Cathy Carter
The beams of steel were escorted from New York City by more than 500 motorcycles and support vehicles.

By Cathy Carter

The Arlington County Virginia fire department received a gift this weekend intended to honor their service at the Pentagon on 9/11.

A procession marched past station house No.5, as the department formally accepted several pieces of steel recovered from the World Trade Center. The gift is meant as a tribute to Arlington County firefighters who were the first responders when American Airlines flight Number 77 crashed into the Pentagon.

"That morning it seemed like the world was coming apart and the firefighters, the paramedics here, and of course in New York and in Shanksville focused singularly on helping people," says Arlington County Fire Chief Jim Schwartz.

He adds that his team of firefighters accomplished unbelievable things that day.

"So watching them out on the west lawn of the Pentagon, watching the chaos and the confusion, but watching them perform like the professionals that they are, just gave me enormous pride," says Schwartz.

The beams of steel were escorted from New York City by more than 500 motorcycles and support vehicles. County officials say the beams will be incorporated into a permanent memorial.

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