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Poll Shows Fenty Behind Gray

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By Patrick Madden

As early voting begins in the District, a Washington Post poll shows challenger Vincent Gray with a commanding lead over Mayor Adrian Fenty.

In 2006, Adrian Fenty swept every precinct in the Democratic primary. Now four years later, the mayor is in serious trouble. The Post poll finds Fenty down by 13 points among registered Democrats and 17 points among likely voters in this years contest.

The poll reveals that while a majority of people surveyed, believe the city is on the right track and credit the mayor for bringing needed change to D.C. Fenty has lost support, particularly among African American voters.

For example, in 2006, 17 percent of black voters held an unfavorable view of the mayor, now that figure has jumped to 56 percent. And according to the poll, city council chair Vincent Gray leads Fenty by 45 points among black democratic voters.

The mayor still holds a significant fundraising advantage over Gray, and nearly a third of those polled say they could change their mind or are still undecided.

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