: News

Bittersweet Tea Helps Mothers Cope

Play associated audio

By Jessica Gould

Every year, mothers who have lost their children to violence come together for an afternoon of sweets and solace.

For Nardyne Jefferies, just filling out a form can be too much.

"You know, do you have any children. Yes or no. And I sat there for a long time because I didn’t know how to answer the question," says Jefferies.

Jefferies' daughter Brishell Jones was killed in the drive-by shootings in Southeast, D.C. last spring. And sometimes, she says, it’s hard to find people who can really understand her pain.

"You hear that a lot. 'Oh I understand.' And you know that they really don’t," she says.

This weekend, Jefferies attended a summertime tea for mothers who have lost their children to violence. Over cookies and crumpets, they shared strategies for survival. Jefferies says she never wanted to be part of this club, but she’s grateful for the support.

"When you come to an event like this and it’s put on in such a nice, tasteful manner you do feel a little solace in knowing there are people who truly understand," she says.

The Willard Hotel hosts the annual event, which was founded by a group called Forgiving Mothers.


ABC Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of 'A Charlie Brown Christmas'

ABC will air "It's Your 50th Christmas Charlie Brown" Monday night. On the classic Christmas cartoon's golden anniversary, NPR explores what makes this ageless special endure.

L.A.'s Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

Providence is widely considered the finest restaurant in Los Angeles. Its award-winning chef, Michael Cimarusti, is piloting Dock to Dish, a program that hooks chefs up directly with local fishermen.

Top Paper's Endorsement Doesn't Always Equal Success In New Hampshire

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie nabbed the backing of the New Hampshire Union Leader this weekend, citing his executive and national security experience. But that doesn't mean he's guaranteed a win.

Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

It took about 30 teams of scientists worldwide, using supercomputers to churn through mountains of data, to see patterns aligning of what will happen decades and centuries from now.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.