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After Rallies, Activists Plan For What Comes Next

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Thousands gathered in downtown Washington, D.C. for the "Restoring Honor" and "Reclaim the Dream" rallies on Saturday.
Thousands gathered in downtown Washington, D.C. for the "Restoring Honor" and "Reclaim the Dream" rallies on Saturday.

By Cathy Carter and Jessica Gould

Most of those who gathered in Washington to rally and counter-rally on the National Mall this weekend have now gone back home. While the two opposing groups have different philosophies and different goals, both have their eyes on what comes next.

Tom Cranmer is a member of the Northern Virginia Tea Party. He attended this weekend’s "Restoring Honor" Rally and says he was inspired. Now, he says, it’s time to bring the message back home. And he has a few ideas.

"First of all, get active in politics. Secondly, stay active in your church. Thirdly, write letters. Fourthly, try to get into government and change things yourself," says Cranmer.

Jessica Gould spent time with activists attending the "Reclaim the Dream" rally at Dunbar High School in Northwest, D.C., where some also had change in mind.

Maryland resident Denise White-Jennings says America has come a long way since Martin Luther King, Jr. first described his dream 47 years ago. But she says the march toward justice isn’t over yet.

"I think we need to keep with us that we can't sit down. We can’t go back to work on Monday and just say, well, ok. I have a job. We need to volunteer. We need to write letters. Whenever we see any type of injustice, we need to speak out. We absolutely need to vote," says White-Jennings.

Leaders of both rallies urged supporters to be respectful of one another. And police say they were. There were no incidents of violence reported.


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