Local Tea Party Group Joins Beck and Palin on the National Mall | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Local Tea Party Group Joins Beck and Palin on the National Mall

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By Cathy Carter

Tens of thousands of people traveled to Washington this weekend to attend a conservative rally. But for some, the journey was just a Metro ride away.

It's early morning and several members of the Northern Virginia Tea Party are gathered at their meeting spot on the National Mall. Together they walk to the Lincoln Memorial for the Restoring Honor Rally hosted by conservative TV Host Glenn Beck, and featuring former Alaska governor Sarah Palin.

"We must restore America and restore her honor," Palin says to the crowd.

The Northern Virginia Tea Party says they have 1,500 members. Linda Cranmner from Great Falls joined last year.

"I'm here because I think the country has lost its way and I want to be with other like minded people who want to restore the country to what it was when the founding fathers founded it, to remember what we are all about, our values our constitution," Cranmer says.

Although organizers had a permit for 300,000 people, crowd estimates were not immediately available.

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