Sharpton Leads Protest Against Beck | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Sharpton Leads Protest Against Beck

Play associated audio

By Matt Laslo

Local elected officials and civil rights leaders will hold a march of their own this morning in response to conservative broadcaster Glenn Beck's rally on the National Mall.

Beck says he didn't know today was the 47th anniversary of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Coincidence or not, Beck's plan angered many who say an anti-government rally isn't in keeping with the anniversary.

Counter demonstrators will assemble at 11 a.m. at Dunbar High School and at 1 p.m., they'll head to the Lincoln Memorial just when Beck's event is set to end.

The Reverend Al Sharpton says he's not concerned about that.

"We're nonviolent. In fact we rallied our march totally away from them and our march is not even starting until their permit says they're supposed to be off. So we're not trying to have a confrontation. He did," Sharpton told reporters.

Organizers of the counter march say they'll also highlight Washington's push for statehood to end what they say is the disenfranchisement of D.C. residents.

WAMU 88.5

A Conversation With American Ballet Theatre's Misty Copeland (Rebroadcast)

Acclaimed ballerina Misty Copeland joined Diane to talk about her remarkable career and how she is challenging physical stereotypes that she says keep ballet stuck in the past.

NPR

Why The World Might Be Running Out Of Cocoa Farmers

West African cocoa farmers earn less than $1 a day. Those low wages could jeopardize the future of chocolate labor, as young farmers find better opportunities to earn a living, a new report warns.
WAMU 88.5

Danielle Allen: "Our Declaration" (Rebroadcast)

For the Fourth of July: A fresh reading of the Declaration of Independence, and how ideas of freedom and equality have been interpreted over the years.

NPR

How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

When you're buying a smartphone, chances are you don't dig too deeply into the personal assistant. Google aims to change that — and in the process, it's testing our appetite for privacy in a big way.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.