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Statewide Computer Meltdown Hampers Va. DMVs

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The DMV in Tysons Corner is eerily quiet. A statewide computer meltdown is preventing all DMVs in Virginia from processing licenses and ID cards.
David Schultz
The DMV in Tysons Corner is eerily quiet. A statewide computer meltdown is preventing all DMVs in Virginia from processing licenses and ID cards.

By David Schultz

The Virginia state government is grappling with a major computer meltdown.

And that's causing problems at the Commonwealth's Department of Motor Vehicles.

No DMV in Virginia can issue licenses or ID cards right now.

A spokesman with the Virginia's IT agency says the state's network storage system - and its backup - failed.

Lauren Otom is at the DMV in Tysons Corner with her 12-year-old son, Joey. "Just starting 7th grade at Luther Jackson," he says.

Lauren needs to get Joey's official ID card so he can play football.

"Tomorrow is, I think it's the last weigh-in," she says. "So he needs his ID to be able to play."

Lauren says they'll come back tomorrow, but the Otoms may not have any more luck then.

The IT spokesman says specialists will be working through the night, but she couldn't estimate when they'll have everything fixed.

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