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Md. Uses Cameras To Catch Speeders In School Zone

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By Jessica Jordan

In Maryland, speeding has become such a big problem in one Montgomery County school zone, that police have to decide to put two new fixed-pole speeding cameras there.

Over a recent seven day period, police monitored traffic in front of White Oak Middle School here on New Hampshire Avenue. And they found that 36,000 vehicles were going 52 miles an hour or more in this 40 mile an hour zone. Dozens of parents like Allie Plihal had been complaining for years.

"It's unnerving to have traffic going by so fast so close to the school, even the buses getting out onto the roads at times can be difficult," says Plihal.

Montgomery County police Captain Thomas Didone, who heads the traffic division, says the cameras should slow drivers down.

"By putting the information about where these camera sites are, where we are doing enforcement on our website, we want you to know that we're out here," says Didone.

And Didone says as an added bonus, he expects these cameras will keep speeds down around two other schools less than a mile down the road.

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