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Longer Flights A Concern For Virginia

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By Michael Pope

Tom Murphy likes to come to Alexandria's waterfront for quiet contemplation. Murphy, who's an Episcopal priest, says the scenery is inspiring except for one thing, the constant traffic of airplanes flying overhead.

"As I was sitting there this morning, I realized there is a lot of traffic, air traffic, coming down, and you sort of tune it out at one level. But it's always present," says Murphy.

Those planes could get a lot bigger if congressional leaders approve a plan that would ease longstanding restrictions against long-distance flights.

Congressman Jim Moran says that's a problem. But he says the biggest problem with long-distance flights concerns the delicate economic balance between National and Dulles.

"If the flights are shifted over to National, that means more profit would be going into National, more revenue. And thus Dulles would be less able to pay off their expansion bonds and pay for Dulles rail," says Moran.

Moran hopes to work with Virginia's two senators to defeat the effort.

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