Longer Flights A Concern For Virginia | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Longer Flights A Concern For Virginia

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

Tom Murphy likes to come to Alexandria's waterfront for quiet contemplation. Murphy, who's an Episcopal priest, says the scenery is inspiring except for one thing, the constant traffic of airplanes flying overhead.

"As I was sitting there this morning, I realized there is a lot of traffic, air traffic, coming down, and you sort of tune it out at one level. But it's always present," says Murphy.

Those planes could get a lot bigger if congressional leaders approve a plan that would ease longstanding restrictions against long-distance flights.

Congressman Jim Moran says that's a problem. But he says the biggest problem with long-distance flights concerns the delicate economic balance between National and Dulles.

"If the flights are shifted over to National, that means more profit would be going into National, more revenue. And thus Dulles would be less able to pay off their expansion bonds and pay for Dulles rail," says Moran.

Moran hopes to work with Virginia's two senators to defeat the effort.

NPR

HBO And 'Game Of Thrones' Haul In The Most Emmy Nominations

HBO got 99 nominations for the 2014 Emmy Awards, the most of any network. HBO's Game of Thrones got 19 nominations, one ahead of FX's miniseries Fargo.
NPR

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

Many processed foods contain cellulose, which is plant fiber that is commonly extracted from wood. It's used to add texture, prevent caking and boost fiber. And it's been around for ages.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Democrats And Republicans Fight Over Investigating Senator's Resignation

Democrats and Republicans in Virginia are at odds over the value of investigating the state Senator Phil Puckett, who resigned last month to take a job at a state tobacco commission — and turned the Senate over to Republicans.
NPR

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

According to a report in The New York Times, hackers accessed U.S. government databases in March and apparently targeted files on employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.