: News

Voters Won't Decide Ambulance Fees In Montgomery County

Play associated audio

By Matt Bush

In Maryland's Montgomery County, residents likely will soon have to pay fees to take an ambulance. That's after the county board of elections struck down a petition to let voters decide the question this fall via a ballot measure. Supporters of the petition did not collect enough valid signatures to get it on the ballot.

That means the fees, charged to anyone who uses an ambulance in the county, will soon be issued. Acting County Attorney Marc Hansen says county residents will have the fees charged to their insurance. If they have no insurance, the county will cover the fee.

"Non-residents would be assessed the fee. Of course if they have insurance, the insurance company would pay for that. But the remainder of the fee, deductibles, or for non-residents who are not insured, they would be subject to the fee. But they would be able to request a hardship waiver," says Hansen.

Many volunteer fire departments worry residents will now be hesitant to dial 9-1-1 for help because they would have to pay for taking an ambulance to the hospital.

NPR

Beyond 'Sesame Street': A New Sesame Studios Channel On YouTube

Sesame Workshop, the company behind Sesame Street, unveils a new initiative to reach kids in a digital and mobile age. NPR gets a sneak peek.
NPR

The Environmental Cost Of Growing Food

Economists are working on ways to put a price on the environmental damage of growing food. Take sugar: Half of what we eat comes from beets, half from cane. Each has an impact, in very different ways.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 6, 2016

Metro announces its maintenance plan--and the service disruptions it will cause. Election watchdogs question Baltimore primary results. And Republicans in our region are put on the spot about supporting GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump.

NPR

Beyond 'Sesame Street': A New Sesame Studios Channel On YouTube

Sesame Workshop, the company behind Sesame Street, unveils a new initiative to reach kids in a digital and mobile age. NPR gets a sneak peek.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.