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ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) Virginia Railway Express officials have received permission to sell rail cars and locomotives to the Army, which is seeking news ways of moving military personnel between bases. VRE's chief executive officer has permission to sell 10 rail cars and three locomotives to the Army for $250,000.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The latest Virginia State Police crackdown on speeders and reckless drivers has resulted in more than 4,000 traffic violations. State troopers tallied that number over the weekend on Interstates 64 and 66. The safety campaign dubbed ``Operation Air, Land + Sea'' nabbed 2,157 speeders and 394 reckless drivers.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) A Richmond man faces a January trial in the slaying of his girlfriend. Michael Solomon is accused in Richmond Circuit Court of murder and concealing the body of Tameka Claiborne and abducting Claiborne's 3-year-old son, Malik Ellison. Authorities believe the 28-year-old Solomon and Claiborne had been arguing about money.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

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WAMU 88.5

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WAMU 88.5

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NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

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