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Racial Divide in D.C. Mayor's Race

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By Patrick Madden

The vote in the D.C. mayor's race is breaking down along racial lines -- that's according to the results of a new poll by Clarus Research Group.

And for the first time this campaign season, the issue of race has become, well, an issue.

According to Clarus, top challenger Vincent Gray holds a 38-point advantage with African-American voters - and Mayor Adrian Fenty holds an ever bigger lead with white voters.

Today, as the two men squared off at a debate hosted by WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi, both candidates were asked what to make of this split.

"Well I think it's regrettable that we have this kind of apparent racial divide in the District of Columbia and there clearly is a perception that there are some people in this city who are getting more than others," says Chairman Gray.

Fenty countered that it's essentially a communication problem -- he says his administration has completed a number of projects in the city's predominately black neighborhoods.

"Why do people still have some qualms with my campaign- I think its my fault - I think I gotta do a better job of educating people about what we have done," says Fenty.

The primary is scheduled for September 14th.

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