Baltimore Promotes Safe Sleep To Prevent Infant Deaths | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Baltimore Promotes Safe Sleep To Prevent Infant Deaths

Play associated audio

By Cathy Duchamp

The city of Baltimore is putting a human face on the issue of infant mortality. The latest numbers show the city is almost double the Maryland state average when it comes to baby deaths. Mothers, are at the center of a campaign to prevent infant deaths through safe sleeping practices.

The public service announcements feature real moms who share the horror of losing their babies in sleep-related deaths.

"We want to tap people where there emotions are and when you hear these women’s stories most people get very emotional," says Cathy Church Balin with the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

It’s one of the organizations behind the so-called ‘Sleep Safe’ campaign. She says fear gets people to pay attention.

"To alleviate the fear we give the solution, that’s the behavior change we’re hoping for," she says.

The best way for your baby to sleep safe is alone, on their back in a crib, no exceptions

The campaign won’t last forever. The hope is that the message will stick, that people will just grow up knowing the phrase ‘alone, back, crib, no exceptions.’

NPR

Message From Documentary 'Citizenfour': Be Afraid (Of Surveillance)

Ken Turan reviews the documentary Citizenfour from filmmaker Laura Poitras about Edward Snowden and his decision to leak information about the National Security Agency's surveillance activities.
NPR

A Wisecracking Biochemist Shares Her Kitchen ABCs

Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage's red hue while it's in the pan.
NPR

With Biden By His Side, Minnesota Democrat Mines For Blue-Collar Vote

Embattled Democrat Rep. Rick Nolan, who represents Minnesota's Iron Range, gets a campaign visit from the administration's blue-collar vote whisperer, Joe Biden.
NPR

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

If you call 911 from inside a tall building, emergency responders may have difficulty finding you. Cellphone GPS technology currently doesn't work well indoors — but the FCC hopes to change that.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.