Cooking Shellfish Protects Against Bacteria | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Cooking Shellfish Protects Against Bacteria

Play associated audio
Dr. Clifford Mitchell recommends thinking twice about eating raw shellfish.
http://www.flickr.com/flydime
Dr. Clifford Mitchell recommends thinking twice about eating raw shellfish.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

The brackish water of the Chesapeake Bay is warming, as it does every summer, and Maryland Health Officials say that means the risk of bacterial infection is rising, too.

Cooking shellfish is one way to protect yourself.

Stan Wise is shucking oysters at the raw bar at Jesse Taylor Seafood on the Southwest Waterfront. His favorite way to eat oysters is what he calls the Eastern Shore Way.

"You use your Oysters with Juice, green pepper, onion, little bit of mustard, and put 'em in pancake mix, and you fry it. Make it into cakes," says Wise.

Wise's oysters are from cold water farms, but his recipe is a good idea if you get shellfish from warmer places including the Chesapeake Bay, at least this time of year.

As the water gets warmer, there's more Vibrio, that's a bacteria related to cholera. It can get into shellfish and can make people sick, says Dr Clifford Mitchell. He's Maryland's Assistant Director for Environmental Health and Food Protection.

"We know there is a chance you can get exposed to vibrio in warmer waters with raw seafood, so we want to make sure that people know that and take appropriate precautions," says Mitchell.

Just keep shellfish cool, make sure you trust your restaurant, and think twice about raw shellfish if you have underlying health problems. Mitchell also advises against swimming in brackish water with open cuts.

NPR

The Dread Factor: Why Ebola And 'Contagion' Scare Us So Much

Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
NPR

Author And His Daughter Cook Around The Word And You Can Too

Kelly McEvers talks to food writer Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia about their cookbook International Night, based on their tradition of cooking a meal every week from a different country.
NPR

Senate Control May Swing On North Carolina's Unpopularity Contest

Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan wants voters to punish her GOP challenger Thom Tillis, the speaker of the state House, for unpopular laws. Tillis wants to aim anger toward the president at Hagan.
NPR

Islamic State Uses Online Strategies To Get Its Message Out

Experts say the videotaped killing of journalist James Foley is part of a broader propaganda strategy by Islamist militants. The group, the Islamic State, has become a master of the video medium.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.