: News

Warmer Water Increases Risk of Bacteria Infection In Cuts, Shellfish

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Maryland's Department of Health says warm water in the Chesapeake Bay is increasing the risk of infection from a naturally occurring bacteria.

Vibrio is a bacteria in the cholera family that grows naturally in the bay and it really likes warm brackish water.

"It can cause very serious infections," says Dr. Clifford Mitchell, Maryland's assistant director for environmental health and food protection.

"Two of the infections that we worry about are from eating or swallowing vibrio, and what are called wound infections, which is when vibrio gets directly into an open wound," he says.

Mitchell says people with underlying health problems should avoid raw shellfish in particular, though there's a risk for everyone. Make sure oysters and clams are kept cool, and he says avoid swimming in brackish water if you have open cuts. So far 24 cases have been reported in Maryland.


'Purple Rain' — As Retold In A Language Without A Word For Purple

Prince's '80s-era classic has gotten a modern update — in Niger. Directed by Christopher Kirkley, starring Tuareg tribe members, this Purple Rain remake drops the kissing but keeps the attitude.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.