: News

Warmer Water Increases Risk of Bacteria Infection In Cuts, Shellfish

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Maryland's Department of Health says warm water in the Chesapeake Bay is increasing the risk of infection from a naturally occurring bacteria.

Vibrio is a bacteria in the cholera family that grows naturally in the bay and it really likes warm brackish water.

"It can cause very serious infections," says Dr. Clifford Mitchell, Maryland's assistant director for environmental health and food protection.

"Two of the infections that we worry about are from eating or swallowing vibrio, and what are called wound infections, which is when vibrio gets directly into an open wound," he says.

Mitchell says people with underlying health problems should avoid raw shellfish in particular, though there's a risk for everyone. Make sure oysters and clams are kept cool, and he says avoid swimming in brackish water if you have open cuts. So far 24 cases have been reported in Maryland.


When Cultural Heritage Is At Risk, Italy's Art Police Come To The Rescue

Over the decades, they've tracked down looted paintings and manuscripts, and rescued artwork after natural disasters. These days, they're salvaging centuries-old works in Italy's Amatrice quake zone.

In Jerusalem And West Bank, Nutella Cafes Offer A Sweet Refuge

Palestinians are flocking to a string of Nutella cafés that have popped up in the region. The cafes offer a welcome refuge from the realities of living in a conflict zone.

From Pot To Guns To School Funding: Here's What's On The Ballot In Your State

Big themes on ballots this November include marijuana, elections, education, guns, tobacco, minimum wage and the death penalty.

Major Websites Experience Outages In Apparent Online Attack

A number of major websites, including Twitter, Spotify and Reddit, were knocked out of service for parts of the day in a sprawling, sophisticated online attack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.