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LEESBURG, Va. (AP) Police in Virginia believe that a serial killer who fatally stabbed five people and wounded 10 others in Michigan since May is also responsible for a series of stabbings in a northern Virginia town that have almost exclusively targeted black men. Leesburg police say the same man is responsible not only for the two stabbings and a hammer attack in his town in the last week as well as the Michigan killings.

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) Virginia Tech students and employees now have a system that can help them predict bus arrival times and give other information about their public-transportation commute. The VT Bus Tracker system was developed by a Virginia Tech computer science class.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) The University of Virginia has removed about 3,850 land-line telephones from residence halls in a move that will save $500,000 annually. The removal of the telephones marks the fact that today's students overwhelmingly rely on mobile phones.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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