Virginia To Consider More Transparency | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Virginia To Consider More Transparency

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

Police agencies in Virginia routinely deny access to incident reports, regardless of whether the case is open or closed. That bothers Roanoke state Senator John Edwards, who introduced a bill earlier this year to make documents available in cases that are no longer being investigated.

"Once a case is over, absent a compelling reason to keep it secret, it ought to generally be released," says Edwards.

But since that's not the way it works now, Edwards is taking his case to the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council, which will consider the issue next week. The legislature often follows the council's advice.

Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police Dana Schrad says her organization might end up supporting Edwards' bill.

"We are always very open to discussing ways in which we can better accommodate the interests and the needs of the public as long as we don't compromise criminal investigations or the safety of individuals," says Schrad.

One compromise the senator is willing to offer would be to let people who want documents make their case before a judge.

NPR

Sarah Koenig On Serial: 'I Think Something Went Wrong With This Case'

Serial, the hugely popular (and sometimes controversial) podcast spun off from This American Life, wraps up its first season today. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Serial creator Sarah Koenig.
NPR

What The Change In U.S.-Cuba Relations Might Mean For Food

The decision to normalize relations is driving all kinds of speculation about American food companies opening up shop in Cuba. But analysts say: Don't expect to see McDonald's there anytime soon.
NPR

In List Of Changes For Secret Service, A New Fence Comes First

An independent review panel calls for changes ranging from a better fence at the White House to a new approach to training and leadership within the Secret Service.
NPR

North Korea Has Invested Heavily In Cyberattacks

American officials have concluded that North Korea was behind the hack of Sony Pictures Company. Melissa Block talks to James Lewis of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.