: News

High School Students Look For An Edge

Play associated audio

By Michael Pope

School doesn't start for weeks, but some students are already thinking about getting into the right college. Some of them gather each week at T.C. Williams High School looking for an edge. Rising senior Marian Wolz says the competition for in-state schools is steep.

"They will be more and more competitive because of this economy, because not as many people can afford to go out of state," says Wolz.

Enter Karen Schwarz. She started coaching students on the college admissions process last year. Now she's at T.C. Williams giving free tips. So listen up, college-bound boys and girls. Schwarz warns against bragging in essay submissions. She says, focus on strong verbs instead of extraneous adjectives, and ultimately, craft what she calls "beefy sentences."

"Instead of saying 'I love going to the park,' you might say, 'Going to the park is my escape from the chaos of a big public high school,'" says Schwarz.

Schwarz also says don't rely on spell check, or you may end up like the student who sent a college essay identifying her favorite Disney movie as the "Loin King."


A Star-Crossed 'Scientific Fact': The Story Of Vulcan, Planet That Never Was

For decades, astronomers believed there was another planet in our solar system, tucked just out of sight. Then Albert Einstein figured out it wasn't there. Author Thomas Levenson explains.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

2 Degrees In Paris: The Global Warming Set To Dominate Climate Conversation

As world leaders gather in Paris to talk about climate change, one phrase that will dominate conversations is "two degrees." Global leaders will discuss how to prevent global temperatures from warming by more than two degrees since the industrial revolution.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.