: News

Archdiocese Of Baltimore Sues City Over Pro-Life Abortion Centers

Play associated audio

By Sanaz Meshkinpour

U.S. District court Judge Marvin Garbis has heard arguments in a lawsuit that claims Baltimore is violating the First Amendment rights of pro-life pregnancy centers. But Garbis did not make a ruling in the case.

Last November, Baltimore passed an ordinance requiring pregnancy centers to post disclaimers if they don't provide abortions or contraception.

Baltimore's Archdiocese sued the city, claiming the law tries to regulate free speech and it singles out the pro-life pregnancy centers, not pro-choice ones.

Sean Caine, Communications Director of the Archdiocese, says the law forces centers to say they don't provide birth control, when they actually do.

"They provide education on abstinence," says Caine. "They also provide information about natural family planning, which are both medically recognized as forms of birth control."

During the hearing, Judge Garbis raised questions about the wording of the Baltimore law. But he said he thinks a woman walking into a pregnancy clinic should know right away that the center doesn't refer for abortions.

The city wants the lawsuit dismissed-stating that it doesn't want pregnant women to be misled.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

At The Democratic Convention, Choreographing A Sea Of Signs

Watch even a few minutes and you're bound to see some synchronized sign-holding — brightly colored placards with slogans like "Stronger Together" waving in the crowd.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.