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National Night Out Observance Dedicated To Local Hero

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By Elliott Francis

More than 200 residents in and around Seat Pleasant, Maryland joined with local law enforcement officials to participate in the 27th annual National Night Out observance. Among those at the event, was the brother of a local Maryland state trooper murdered just two months ago.

At this year's event in Seat Pleasant, Maryland participants took part in a solemn dedication.

Maryland State Trooper Westley Brown grew up here. Killed in June while working an off duty security detail at a Forestville restaurant, Brown was well known for having mentored many at risk young men in the area through an organization called Young Men Enlightening Young Men.

Sylvester Brown is the trooper's older brother. He says he's here to help sustain his sibling's legacy.

"The community actually cared and supported him in what he had to do, and that's why I'm going to do the same thing. I'm going to follow in his footsteps," says Brown.

Brown says his brother embraced the purpose of National Night Out.

"He wanted to get people in the community more familiar with police. Let them know, they're not the enemy," he says.

Brown adds, his brother personally mentored more that two dozen young men.

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