: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Rejects GOP Nominee For Elections Board

Play associated audio

By Patrick Madden

With city-wide elections less than two months away, the Districts board of elections and ethics is still short one member.

The D.C. Council rejected Mayor Fenty's choice to fill the spot reserved for someone from a minority party.

The council rejected Republican nominee Mital Gandhi by a vote of 7 to 4. The three person board can still operate and issue decisions with just two members. But with this year's hotly-contested mayors race, as well as the slew of changes to the District's election laws, the board will be under more pressure than usual.

City council member Mary Cheh says she's hopeful the mayor and the council will be able to settle on a new nominee.

"There's no reason why if a name comes over soon, we couldn't act before the primary," says Cheh. "I have every confidence that at least from our end we could move quickly."

Gandhi was rejected by some council members because of concerns over his lack of experience and qualifications, and after the vote, Ganhdi, in an email, accused the council of playing politics and labeled its move a Gray for mayor vote.

NPR

A Biography Of Your Cubicle: How This Became The Modern Workplace

The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
NPR

California Farmers Finagle A Fig For All Seasons

Two growers are competing to harvest fresh figs earlier and earlier in hopes of transforming the industry for year-round production. But some fig lovers say they can hold out for summer fruit.
WAMU 88.5

On National Mall, Native Americans Protest Keystone XL Pipeline

Native Americans from across the country are visiting Washington this week to protest the construction of a controversial pipeline in the Midwest.
NPR

Life Outside The Fast Lane: Startups Wary Of Web Traffic Plan

The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.