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Maryland Funding Program Helps Save Small business

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Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett joins Md. Lt Gov. Anthony Brown and store owner Ali Rostai at re-opening of Rostai's in Silver Spring, MD.
Elliott Francis
Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett joins Md. Lt Gov. Anthony Brown and store owner Ali Rostai at re-opening of Rostai's in Silver Spring, MD.

By Elliott Francis

A funding partnership between the state of Maryland and Montgomery County has helped preserve a local business and jobs.

Rosta's, a popular clothing store in Silver Spring, Maryland was on Colesville road until they lost their lease back in 2007.

Now they're celebrating the opening of their new location, a few blocks over, secured with the help of a $580,000 investment by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development.

Lt. Governor Anthony Brown says the credit goes to the DHCD program called 'Neighborhood Business Works'.

"We're really excited about it and we're looking at more of these opportunities across the state to put Marylanders back to work to create jobs, and to support local businesses," he says.

The state's loan was on top of an initial investment made by store owners.

Without the additional funds, owner Ali Rostai says his store might have folded.

Instead he expects to add 20 workers when he reopens later this month.

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