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Highest Paid Metro Board Member Misses Many Meetings

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By David Schultz

The money Metro Board members get paid varies widely. Virginia and D.C. pay its members a small stipend, while Montgomery County and the State of Maryland pay each of their three Board members $20,000 a year.

But Prince George's County pays its Board Member, Marcell Solomon, more, much more. For his service as a non-voting member of the Metro Board, Solomon receives $40,000 a year. And Metro documents show that, despite his salary, Solomon missed half of the 28 Board meetings held since January of last year, more than almost all of his colleagues.

"I think it's unfortunate," says Solomon's colleague, Jeff McKay, who represents Northern Virginia on the Metro Board. "Especially during these times when we've got some really important issues we're grappling with, I think you have to be engaged. And part of being engaged is having a good attendance record."

Solomon, who didn't return our phone calls, is reportedly a close, personal friend of Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson, the man who appointed Solomon to the Metro Board. A Prince George's County spokesman says Johnson will encourage Solomon to attend Metro meetings more often.

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