: News

Filed Under:

Minorities Make Up More Than Half Of U.S Organ Transplant Wait List

Play associated audio

By Cathy Carter

Every day 18 people in the U.S die while waiting for an organ transplant, minorities are especially at risk.

In Southeast Washington Rhonda Griffin from the Washington Regional Transplant Community is manning the table at a community health fair. She's registering people to become organ and tissue donors.

"Minorities make up 50 percent of the waiting list so we're the least likely to donate," Griffin tells a potential donor.

While the waiting list for transplant surgery has grown, the number of donors has not. D.C. based Gospel singer Chris Page was one of the lucky ones. Two years ago he had a successful cornea transplant from a deceased tissue donor. He says he thinks about that person every day.

"Well one of the things I always say is thank-you. And one of the things after I end every performance, I touch my eye and point to the sky as a way of saying thank-you to the person who gave for me to have sight," says Page.

Since his own transplant, Page has registered to become an organ donor and donates a portion of his CD sales to Donate Life, a national organ donation organization.


'Tis The Season For Coming Attractions: What To Watch For At The Multiplex

NPR film critic Bob Mondello offers a selective preview of the likely blockbusters and Oscar contenders that Hollywood has in store for the end of the year.

A Tale Of Dread And Duck Breasts: One Chef's Nightmare, Retold

On a day dedicated to massive meals, it's good to recall some kitchen disasters — the embarrassing stories in every cook's life. Mexican chef Pati Jinich recounts one such disaster and her recovery.

Reconsidering The Pilgrims, Piety And America's Founding Principles

Conservatives who want to emphasize America's Christian roots embrace the story of the Pilgrims and the Mayflower Compact. But some historians say their role in the country's founding is overstated.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.