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Minorities Are Encouraged to Become Organ Donors

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By Cathy Carter

Washington D.C's minority community leads the nation when it comes to donating organs, but as Cathy Carter reports, the numbers still fall short of need.

Diseases which result in the need for an organ transplant, like diabetes and hypertension, are more common among African-Americans, Hispanics and Asian-Americans.

Minorities comprise more than half of individuals on the U.S transplant waiting list.

"As result of the fact that there's such a huge disparity, 20 people die every single day because of the shortage of donors," says Doctor Clive Callender, the director of the minority organ tissue transpant education program at Howard University Hospital.

"Minorities now participate more than their percent of the population, so we've come a mighty long way but still have a longer way to go," Callender says.

Minority targeted organ donor designation drives are scheduled at various locations throughout the region this month.

That includes today's registration event today at Giant supermarket in Southeast.

The event includes a concert by gospel singer Chris Page.

He was the recipient of a successful cornea transplant.

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