Authorities Urge Caution After Chemical Bombs Appear In Mailboxes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Authorities Urge Caution After Chemical Bombs Appear In Mailboxes

Play associated audio

By Jessica Gould

Safety authorities in Fairfax County are urging residents to look out for homemade chemical bombs in their mailboxes and front yards.

Great Falls resident Lee-Alison Sibley was returning home from lunch with her husband on Father’s Day when she stopped to clear out some garbage that had been placed in her mailbox.

"I reached into the mailbox to pull out the garbage and one thing I saw was a plastic bottle filled with some kind of liquid," she says. "As soon as I touched the bottle it started to burn and smoke."

As it turns out, the 'garbage' was actually a partially-exploded device – one of at least eight residents have discovered since May.

In published reports, Fairfax officials say no one has been seriously injured by the homemade explosives. But Sibley says the bomb did burn her finger.

"It swelled to twice its size and turned a lovely purplish black," she says.

Sibley says neighbors should keep an eye out for the devices.

And if they see something that looks like garbage in their mailbox, don’t touch it. Call 911, she says, and the police will take it from there.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 17

Art is what you make of it. You can chew, crunch and dance at a bacon-inspired festival or see how a local artist transformed old objects into responsive sculptures.

NPR

Mistura Food Fest Gives Peruvian Cuisine A Chance To Shine

Every September, top chefs from around the world gather to celebrate the diversity of Peruvian cuisine. But not everyone is convinced the food boom is the answer to the country's historic challenges.
NPR

House Poised To Vote On Arming, Training Syrian Rebels

The expected vote on whether to authorize the Obama administration's plan to arm and train moderate fighters comes as the president meets with military officials at U.S. Central Command.
NPR

When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

With the price of solar panels falling, more municipalities and homeowners are installing them. But having solar panels doesn't mean you won't lose power in a blackout — at least not yet.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.