: News

Coburn Hold Stymies Transit Safety Bill, Frustrates Local Congressmen

Play associated audio
The D.C. area's Congressional delegation met to discuss the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board after its year-long investigation into Metro.
David Schultz
The D.C. area's Congressional delegation met to discuss the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board after its year-long investigation into Metro.

By David Schultz

A bipartisan bill imposing new federal safety standards on Metro and other public transit agencies is languishing in Congress.

The NTSB says federal standards are needed to prevent transit accidents like last year's Red Line train crash.

But Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican from Oklahoma, has placed a hold on it, something he does with any bill that contains unbudgeted spending.

That's frustrated the bill's many local supporters.

"I believe that where there's a will, there's a way," Senator Barbara Mikulski, a Democrat from Maryland, says.

She says she'll be paying Coburn a personal visit: "If he wants to hide behind Senate procedures, I'm going to stalk him through the halls and get that bill passed."

And Congressman Steny Hoyer, also a Maryland Democrat, says he doesn't doubt she'll do it.

"I wouldn't want to be on the other side of Senator Mikulski when she says 'Where there's a will...,'" he says. "Because her will is a giant will, and she'll find a way."

But Mikulski will need to act soon.

Congress goes into recess for all of August, then reconvenes for just one month before the midterm elections.

NPR

With 'Formation,' Beyoncé Lights Up The Internet. Here's What People Are Saying

The singer's new music video quickly drew commentary of all kinds — on its references to being black in America, Hurricane Katrina and Black Lives Matter.
NPR

Calif. Restaurant Gives Diners — And Sea Lions — An Ocean View

The Marine Room is a restaurant right on the beach. When the tide is high, waves hit the windows, and bring in unexpected visitors.
NPR

This Year, Anger Is All The Rage In Politics. Why?

It seems that anger is all the rage in this year's election. In a commentary, NPR's Michel Martin reflects on anger as a habit, a practice and a choice.
NPR

Super Bowl 50 Tightens Cybersecurity

This year's Super Bowl will be held in the most technologically advanced stadium in the world. FBI special agent John Lightfoot talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the threat of cyber attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.