: News

Filed Under:

Nurses Consider Strike At Washington Hospital Center

Play associated audio

By Sanaz Meshkinpour

Nurses at Washington Hospital Center are voting on whether to hold a 24-hour strike to protest the dismissal of nurses during last winter's major snowstorm.

After February's blizzard, the hospital fired 18 nurses for failing to get to work in the snow; others were disciplined.

"We believe it's illegal," says Stephen Frum of Nurses United.

Frum says the actions violated a hospital policy of not disciplining employees who are absent during a snow emergency. He says the hospital changed that policy unilaterally.

"They didn't give us notice that they were planning on changing it," says Frum. "Didn't give us an opportunity to discuss it prior to its implementation."

Half of the nurses who were fired were later reinstated. Dr. Janice Orlowski, a hospital administrator, says the ones who were dismissed were guilty of gross misconduct. She says the hospital made every effort to help them get to work, and they could have made it.

"Unfortunately we're dealing with a very small number who quite frankly we felt refused to do their job," says Orlowski.

Nurses United will announce the results of the strike vote Monday morning.

NPR

Trump Off Camera: The Man Behind The 'In-Your-Face Provocateur'

Biographer Marc Fisher says Donald Trump has lived a "strikingly solitary life given how public he is." Fisher and his Washington Post colleague Michael Kranish are the authors of Trump Revealed.
NPR

Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

According to interviews conducted before and after Berkeley imposed a tax on sugary drinks, the tax is having the desired effect. People reported drinking 20 percent fewer sugar-sweetened drinks after the tax went into effect.
NPR

Clinton Foundation To Shrink Considerably If Hillary Clinton Is Elected

The Foundation would give up its most recognizable parts, including its major global health and wellness programs.
WAMU 88.5

Why We Open Our Hearts And Wallets For Some Disasters—But Not Others

Flooding in Louisiana has caused tens of millions of dollars in property damage and untold personal misery. But public response has been slow. Join us to talk about why we open our hearts and wallets for some disasters and not others.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.