Concern Over NTSB Findings Of Metro's Red Line Crash | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Concern Over NTSB Findings Of Metro's Red Line Crash

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By Manuel Quinones

Members of the Washington area Congressional delegation are expressing great concern following a briefing by the National Transportation Safety Board on its findings and recommendations into last year's fatal Metro Red Line crash.

More than half a dozen area lawmakers demanded changes in federal law and from Metro in light of the NTSB report.

"They clearly gave us a roadmap for the path forward," Mikulski says.

Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski says that includes proper funding from Congress and new national standards. She also agrees with House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer in making sure the NTSB suggestions lead to change.

"I will work with local jurisdictions to see that all these recommendations are followed," says Hoyer.

To Virginia Congressman Jim Moran -- change includes a stronger safety culture at Metro.

"Clearly there needs to me a greater concentration on safety," says Moran.

Some lawmakers expressed sadness, concern and anger at the report, which said Metro could have done more to prevent the crash.

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