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Metro Circuit Company Working In Other Cities To Prevent Future Crashes

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By David Schultz

Metro's track circuits are being blamed for last year's deadly Red Line crash, and the company that designed the circuits says it's working with its clients across the country to make sure the crash doesn't happen again.

SEPTA, the public transportation agency in Philadelphia, is one of seven major cities using circuits designed by Alstom Transport, the company Metro uses. Mike Monastero, the head of communications and signals at SEPTA, says Alstom checked his equipment earlier this year and everything came up fine.

"The system that Metro had was 30 years old. Ours is a much newer generation of track circuit equipment," says Monastero. "Ours is probably ten years old now."

Dwight Ferrell, the Chief Operating Officer of MARTA in Atlanta, is another Alstom customer. He says Alstom tested circuits there as well.

"They don't want to see this thing happen in any other places," says Ferrell, "and it's in their best interests to work with us along with the other systems who have been identified."

It's also in Alstom's financial interests. The families of the Metro crash victims are suing Alstom for damages in civil court.

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