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Go-Go Track Sings Fenty's Praises

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By Patrick Madden

The D.C. mayor's race is about to get a lot funkier as Mayor Adrian Fenty uses go-go to help get-out-the-vote. Campaign songs are as old as, well, at least 1840 when that chart-busting "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" helped carry William Henry Harrison into the White House.

And now we have the first musical foray into this year's hotly contested D.C. mayor's race, courtesty of local go-go artist Stinky Dink.

The rapper praises the record of Mayor Adrian Fenty behind a funky, go-go beat. Here's a sample riff:

"A lot more sweat, less blood and tears / got the lowest murder rate in 'bout 40 years / 22,000 jobs for the young'uns / so they can do somethin' constructive for the summer."

In fact, the Fenty Campaign has been organzing go-go concerts this summer to sign up voters. The man behind the concerts, and the campaign song, is Fenty supporter Ron Moten.

"Go-Go is the language for a lot of people in Washington," says Moten.

Moten also says there are three or four more tracks coming out, including one with a vocal by Fenty himself. As for the Gray campaign, no word yet whether they'll respond with a tune of their own. But Gray spokeswoman Traci Hughes says the go-go song has a "nice beat" but has no idea what it has to do with Fenty.

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