: News

Transportation Safety Bill Blocked In Senate

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

The National Transportation Safety Board is calling on Congress to pass a new transit safety bill to prevent accidents like last year's deadly Metro crash. The bill would give the federal government power to regulate transit agencies like Metro.

It passed unanimously through a Senate committee last month, but Democratic Senate staffers say it hasn't gone to the floor because Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.)is threatening a filibuster. Coburn's office did not answer requests for comment today.

"Well, that's disappointing," says Jim Berard, a House Democratic staffer for the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. "But that's not unusual in the political climate that we operate in."

Berard is working on a similar bill, but he says the House won't even look at it until it passes the Senate.

"It really wouldn't do any good for us in the House to take action on the bill if it's just going die in the Senate again," he says.

Majority Leader Harry Reid's office says, with Coburn's threats of filibuster, there's no way the bill will get to the Senate floor before the August recess.

NPR

Snoopy, Garfield And Friends Go Bald For Kids With Cancer

Kids don't want to look different, especially if the reason they look different is because they've lost their hair to chemotherapy. If Hello Kitty's gone bald, too, maybe it won't feel so bad.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
WAMU 88.5

Environmentalists Turn To Campaign Finance Reform To Advance Cause

Frustrated by the lobbying power of oil and gas companies, environmenalists are joining the call for campaign finance reform in Washington.

NPR

FCC Set To Change Net Neutrality Rules

On Thursday, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules for how broadband providers should treat the Internet traffic flowing through their networks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.