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Students Converge On Washington To Support Animals

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By Cathy Carter

Hundreds of animal advocates will be on Capitol Hill today. It's possible, some will need an adult chaperone.

At the Taking Action for Animals Student Summit in Northwest Washington young animal rights activists are being schooled on how to lobby their legislators. Step one, identify your lawmaker.

"So make sure that you know who that is before the morning, we gave you that homework before you came or you had to select that person in order to register but if you're still not sure, don't be afraid to come to the table and ask us, we will help you figure out who it is," says one of the organizers from the conference podium.

Students between the ages of 13 to 22 will lobby for animal rights today, even though some of them aren't old enough to vote.

"That doesn't matter. What matters is that they are going to be actively engaged in the political process, they're going to be watching who supports animal protection and who doesn't and they're going to be very involved into the future," says Nancy Perry from The Humane Society.

She says students will ask their legislators to vote for several animal rights bills, including The Truth in Fur Labeling Act. That legislation is co-sponsored by Virginia Congressman Jim Moran.


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