Reports: Half of Counties in Md., Va. Face Risk Of Water Shortages By 2050 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Reports: Half of Counties in Md., Va. Face Risk Of Water Shortages By 2050

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By Sara Sciammacco

More than half of the counties in Maryland face the potential risk of water shortages by 2050, according to a new report from the consulting firm Tetra-Tech. Half of the counties in Virginia fall under the same umbrella.

The report concluded that supplies won't be able to keep up with the demand. Peter Altman is with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

"The source of the problem is warming temperatures and we are experiencing this right now and as temperatures continue to rise it means our water problems are going to continue to get worse," says Altman.

Pressure is on Congress to pass legislation to reduce carbon emissions. Farmers in the at-risk counties in Maryland and Virginia produced $935 million worth of corn, soybeans and nursery products in 2007.

"It is going to be hard to sustain that if you cannot grow as many crops because you are just hampered by water," he says.

Legislation, however, faces an uphill battle in the Senate where negotiations continue and divisions remain over when to begin debate.

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