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Experts Advocate Heat Safety All Summer Long

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During the weekend heat wave, children in
Columbia Heights cooled off in a nearby fountain while ice cream vendors tried to make the most of their melted goods.
Jessica Gould
During the weekend heat wave, children in Columbia Heights cooled off in a nearby fountain while ice cream vendors tried to make the most of their melted goods.

By Jessica Gould

It was the kind of heat that felt like it could burn through sandals and singe your toes. And even though the worst might be over for now, Dr. Brian Amy of the D.C. Department of Health says people should continue to keep an eye on the area’s most vulnerable residents.

"Sometimes it’s out of sight out of mind," says Amy. "If it’s a cool day we forget about the heat and we just go on. But even in moderate heat we can still get into trouble by, again, leaving people in shut-up cars, or not checking on people with chronic illnesses or the elderly."

And he says the same rules still apply.

"And it’s still a time when we need to remember all the fundamental things of keeping ourselves as cool as possible, well hydrated and check on everybody to make sure they’re doing well," he says.

After all, he says, the summer's not over yet.

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