: News

Experts Advocate Heat Safety All Summer Long

Play associated audio
During the weekend heat wave, children in
Columbia Heights cooled off in a nearby fountain while ice cream vendors tried to make the most of their melted goods.
Jessica Gould
During the weekend heat wave, children in Columbia Heights cooled off in a nearby fountain while ice cream vendors tried to make the most of their melted goods.

By Jessica Gould

It was the kind of heat that felt like it could burn through sandals and singe your toes. And even though the worst might be over for now, Dr. Brian Amy of the D.C. Department of Health says people should continue to keep an eye on the area’s most vulnerable residents.

"Sometimes it’s out of sight out of mind," says Amy. "If it’s a cool day we forget about the heat and we just go on. But even in moderate heat we can still get into trouble by, again, leaving people in shut-up cars, or not checking on people with chronic illnesses or the elderly."

And he says the same rules still apply.

"And it’s still a time when we need to remember all the fundamental things of keeping ourselves as cool as possible, well hydrated and check on everybody to make sure they’re doing well," he says.

After all, he says, the summer's not over yet.

NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

President Obama's Favorite County — At Least When it Comes to Giving Speeches

President Obama has visited Prince George's County, MD, four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African American majority, and also happens to be very close to the White House.
NPR

Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court

Can a state law prevent political campaigns from doling out misinformation? Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from The Plain Dealer's Sabrina Eaton.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.