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Sports Fans Battle The Heat

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A group of friends persisted with their weekly basketball game in northwest, D.C. But D.C. officials suggested sports fans stay inside.
Jessica Gould
A group of friends persisted with their weekly basketball game in northwest, D.C. But D.C. officials suggested sports fans stay inside.

By Jessica Gould

Experts advise getting plenty of exercise in order to stay healthy. But when temperatures rise as high as they have this weekend, some suggest dropping the ball on a regular sports routine.

Ike Brannon says nothing stops his weekly basketball game. "We play every Saturday morning," he says. "No matter what."

He’s feeling the heat, though. And it’s not just because the other team is playing good offense.

"I’m really tired. I feel really dehydrated. A little sick to my stomach," he says, "But by tomorrow morning when we play again we’ll be fine."

But D.C. parks department Director Jesus Aguirre says when it comes to outdoor sports, athletes should consider sitting out this weekend.

"I think it’s important to be wise and take a break and do something indoors if at all possible," he says.

Or, he says, try one of the city’s pools. Many of them are open longer during the heat wave.

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