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Back To School Health Fairs Help Uninsured Kids In VA

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By Cathy Carter

Children of uninsured families may have difficulty getting check-ups, or required immunizations before entering school for the first time, but now there's a solution.

Back to School Health Fairs are happening in several communities in Northern Virginia. This weekend at the Arlandria Health Center in Alexandria, kids received those mandatory health screenings for free.

"It's just vital for every child in Northern Virginia to have the tools that they need to succeed, and health care is one of them," says J.J. Newby Ketzle, President of the Junior League of Northern Virgina, the organization sponsoring these events.

Her colleague Jeri Kirscher expects to see a record number of families taking advantage of this year's programs.

"With the economy, people have lost their jobs, their homes have gone into foreclosure, and along with losing a job, you lose insurance," she says.

In addition to the free medical tests for children, families can find out if they qualify for Virginia's Child Health Insurance Program.

Back to School Health Fairs are scheduled next month in Herndon and Leesburg, Virginia.

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