Pay-By-License-Plate Program Uses Electronic Monitoring | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Pay-By-License-Plate Program Uses Electronic Monitoring

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By Rebecca Sheir

In an ongoing effort to improve parking in Washington, the D.C. Department of Transportation is offering a new way for drivers to pay for parking.

DDOT is testing its pay-by-license-plate program on a block in Northwest D.C. for the next three months.

Standing next to one of the new meters on U Street Northwest, DDOT spokesperson John Lisle says you need just three things to pay by license plate.

"You just need to know your license plate number," says Lisle, "how long you want to pay for and whether you wish to pay with cash or with a credit card."

The rest, he says, is up to the parking enforcement officers, who will drive camera-mounted vehicles to electronically monitor which drivers have paid, and which haven't.

"Which obviously could be an advantage for us in terms of how much manpower is required, you know, to walk up and down the street and check each vehicle," he says.

Lisle says after the 90-day test period, DDOT will decide whether the pay-by-license-plate system is viable in the long run.

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