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VA Man Charged with Supporting Terror to be Appointed Lawyer

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By Jonathan Wilson

A Northern Virginia man charged with supporting a foreign terrorist organization made his first appearance in federal court this morning.

Zachary Chesser, 20, walked into the courtroom in Alexandria wearing a short-sleeve blue button up shirt and khaki cargo pants.

He barely spoke, mumbling only to give the Judge Theresa Buchanon permission to appoint him a lawyer.

A young woman in full Muslim head covering sat in the courtroom sobbing softly during the proceedings, but declined to identify her relationship with Chesser or comment on Chesser's charges.

He faces a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison, along with a $250,000 fine, for allegedly attempting to travel to Somalia to join the foreign terrorist organization al Shabaab.

Chesser will be back in court at 2:30 Friday afternoon for a preliminary detentional hearing.

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